Author Topic: Firefighters attacked  (Read 8539 times)

Offline lyledunn

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Firefighters attacked
« on: July 14, 2017, 09:21:21 AM »
The peculiarities of Northern Ireland see huge bonfires set alight on 11th July every year. Invariably some get out of control and require fire service intervention. The poor firefighters, just doing their job, are often attacked with stones and bottles thrown by inebriated young louts. The police response is minimal and arrests or repercussions are rare. If it's ok to throw stones it is ok to give a teacher a hard time or be nasty with a nurse in A and E. Society will disintegrate if discipline is lazy. Can I ask if  similar incidents occur elsewhere in the UK?

Offline Bruce89

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Re: Firefighters attacked
« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2017, 08:26:20 PM »
Yes, one reason (not the only I add), why appliances are often fitted with cameras.

Offline Messy

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Re: Firefighters attacked
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2017, 01:51:13 PM »
I am not sure that anything on the mainland compares with the 11th night bonfires and in particular, the methods NIFRS use to deal with them.

I was in NI last week and saw how the fire service plan for the evening. Proper community engagement at a level unknown elsewhere.

They've had years of this to get it right. I am not going to discuss their approach here but its far less gung ho than other fire and rescue services

Offline nearlythere

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Re: Firefighters attacked
« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2017, 07:21:17 AM »
During my time the appliances had sliding bandit screens to protect from stones, bottles and whatever else was handy. Think the yobs thought Dot was on the appliance. Much more normal and peaceful times now that they realise he would be too old to ride.
We're not Brazil we're Northern Ireland.

Offline colin todd

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Re: Firefighters attacked
« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2017, 10:32:52 PM »
Are you still writing, Almost.  I paid good money for gentlemen of standing in the community of East Belfast to cut off your left hand, and equivalent gentlemen in West Belfast you amputate your right.  (Or was it the other way round?)  I shall be demanding my money back.
Colin Todd, C S Todd & Associates

Offline nearlythere

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Re: Firefighters attacked
« Reply #5 on: December 26, 2017, 05:33:59 PM »
I am not sure that anything on the mainland compares with the 11th night bonfires and in particular, the methods NIFRS use to deal with them.

I was in NI last week and saw how the fire service plan for the evening. Proper community engagement at a level unknown elsewhere.

They've had years of this to get it right. I am not going to discuss their approach here but its far less gung ho than other fire and rescue services
Too right Messy. It must be remembered that there are only 6 or is it 5 or is it now 4 on an appliance verses a few thousand of them and not a cop in sight. One thing you learn is that if you are told to F off then you F off.

We're not Brazil we're Northern Ireland.

Offline Golden

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Re: Firefighters attacked
« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2018, 09:44:24 AM »
NT I always remember a NI friend of mine from the college saying that the IC usually had to ask permission to put the fire out!

Offline nearlythere

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Re: Firefighters attacked
« Reply #7 on: January 02, 2018, 01:09:35 PM »
NT I always remember a NI friend of mine from the college saying that the IC usually had to ask permission to put the fire out!

It kinda was Golden but on the night it was a bit more of trying to identify a sober and responsible looking person who would listen to reason when you try to explain that people's property, especially dwellings, are at risk. But most certainly a lot of work has been done and continues on the lead up to the silly season where fire officers engage with the various community leaders to try to bring some form of sanity to the situation. It has worked in many places but also not in many places. But it is essentially the protection of property from the effects of a bonfire by consent. 
We're not Brazil we're Northern Ireland.