Poll

What do Firenetters feel about Regional Fire Controls?

In principle they are a good idea
6 (23.1%)
They are a bad idea
17 (65.4%)
Indifferent / Not sure
3 (11.5%)

Total Members Voted: 25

Author Topic: Regional Fire Controls  (Read 23976 times)

Offline nearlythere

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Re: Regional Fire Controls
« Reply #15 on: April 01, 2010, 08:14:37 PM »
Costs have spiralled out of control. John (two pie and chips - large) Prescott's baby this is.
We're not Brazil we're Northern Ireland.


Offline StuartH

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Re: Regional Fire Controls
« Reply #17 on: August 27, 2010, 01:30:36 PM »
The radio programme can be listened to again via BBC iPlayer at the link below. Worth a listen.

http://beta.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b00tgwlf/Face_the_Facts_Money_To_Burn/

Offline Clevelandfire 3

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Re: Regional Fire Controls
« Reply #18 on: August 28, 2010, 01:24:17 AM »
Getting shafted was the punishment for going on strike - disguised as modernisation. The government wanted to teach the fire service a lesson. It all started from Steven Byers recommending firefighters lobby for a pay raise. Then boom. Andy Gilchrist got seduced down a road where he thought he was in control and leading the charge for rank and file, but HMG backed him into a corner.

So we got ranks to roles which hasnt worked. Make the fire service corporate, not military like has been the tack recently. We have managers now rather than officers and commanders. Watch Manager As and Bs which were Sub Officers and Station officers in my day in line with other emergency and millitary services. But what has actually changed nowadays apart form titles.

Ranks to roles , doesnt that mean a fire safety officer should be just that- a fire safety officer - not a watch manager A or B in the fire safety dept? cos doesnt a watch manager manage a watch? and a fire safety officer inspect buildings? oh sorry me being silly. What a waste of money making nonsensical changes to the system.

Funny out of all of this modernisation no Chief Fire Officer has styled themself as Brigade Manager as was supposed to be the case. I wonder why. Oh yes silly me Brigade Manager doesnt sound glamourous or important enough and those colleagues of theirs in the police force aka the Chief Constables would laugh at them and look down their noses. One rule for the lads down at the masonic lodge one rule for the rest.

Then they fiddle with fire controls. Dont get me started. One million a month spent on empty buildings, spiralling budgets, think tanks pressing ahead with ideas without consulting the people who actually use the facilities.  No wonder this country is in a mess. But as usual no one is held account. Isnt that strange, I dont think.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2010, 01:32:11 AM by Clevelandfire 3 »

Offline kurnal

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Re: Regional Fire Controls
« Reply #19 on: August 28, 2010, 08:20:39 AM »
I hope this control regionalisation program gets stopped in its tracks. Theres much more to their role than handling 999 calls and turning out fire appliances. Obviously firefighting can be harrowing, arduous and involve long hours, exposure to trauma. Few staff stretched in all manner of ways. In the old days the control staff would know their crews well and were an integral part of the brigade team. They kept an eye on us and looked out for us. They had topography skills, they knew their patch and local landmarks, very often helping to pin point the inaccurate locations provided by callers. All of this is of great value as part of an effective and efficinet fire service, and all is likely to suffer as a result of regionalisation.

 And now the coalition Government  is talking of cutting back further to just 3 centres. The next step will be to staff them with security guards not fire control staff.

Let us hope that the plug is pulled on this ill conceived, wasteful and service damaging  project before its too late. For the sake of our fire and rescue services.

Offline colin todd

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Re: Regional Fire Controls
« Reply #20 on: August 29, 2010, 12:42:15 AM »
Kurnal,  While none of this is of any interest to me if I am really honest, I feel bound to ask the question re knowledge of topography etc, how have the highlands and islands f&rs always managed fine with the largest fire brigade area in europe, taking calls from the whole of the highlands, the western isles, orkneys and shetlands. (Ok, often  they do have the benefit of a scottish education and as in the case of all H&I people have a lovely nature, but its still a big area to know.)
Colin Todd, C S Todd & Associates

Offline kurnal

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Re: Regional Fire Controls
« Reply #21 on: August 29, 2010, 11:09:46 PM »
It is a very big area and they know it very well. Relatively few urban areas, roads sparse but many topographical features.  Fairly low resource levels to service the area. The knowledge has been gained over many years and local interest sparks enthusiasm for learning it and above all ownership of their patch. Yes their patch is bigger but there is less within it.  Like in those areas of the Higlands  where the nearest shop is 40 miles away- its still their "Local" shop. Ownership not only brings out the best levels of service, it also brings true job satisfaction.

I know that the value of such knowledge is not to be underestimated. Having been tasked with producing a complete mobilising gazetteer for my last brigade including geographical features, special risks, SSSIs and monuments as well as roads and buildings, then mixing in proximity data and  appliance routing data for mobilising before tom tom had even been dreamed about I do have some interest in this topic.

Those modernisers who seem to think that digital networks and  sat navs can replace this are in cloud cuckoo land. Just as when we lost our officers PMR radios in favour of cellphones and then were always outside range or worse still the network clogged for major emergencies. The much publicised prioritisation for emergency services only worked for a few gold command nominated phones.  And sat nav  and computers are hopeless for mobilising when numerous roads are blocked by landslip, snow or floods. Thats when the local knowledge comes into its own.
« Last Edit: August 29, 2010, 11:13:22 PM by kurnal »