Author Topic: Wooden Balconies/Cladding etc  (Read 178 times)

Offline Suttonfire

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Wooden Balconies/Cladding etc
« on: June 25, 2019, 04:13:24 PM »
In view of the recent fire at the block of flats in Barking, I wondered how people approach wooden balcony's cladding etc when carrying out a fire risk assessment.

Do you recommend as a matter of course that wooden materials should be treated with flame retardant products etc, even if the building has been 'signed off' in its current state? This seems like a difficult issue to deal with retrospectively at existing buildings.

Offline AnthonyB

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Re: Wooden Balconies/Cladding etc
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2019, 07:21:54 PM »
Ripping them out seems to be the recommended action, effectively admitting (what was already known by many) that sign off under the Building Regulations is worthless:
https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/811194/Advice_on_Balconies_on_Residential_Buildings.pdf
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Offline Fishy

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Re: Wooden Balconies/Cladding etc
« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2019, 07:35:40 AM »
In view of the recent fire at the block of flats in Barking, I wondered how people approach wooden balcony's cladding etc when carrying out a fire risk assessment.

Do you recommend as a matter of course that wooden materials should be treated with flame retardant products etc, even if the building has been 'signed off' in its current state? This seems like a difficult issue to deal with retrospectively at existing buildings.

There are no treatments that I am aware of that can be applied to timber in situ and which are a) weather-resistant; or b) resistant to physical contact.  The intumescent products tend to be ruined by moisture, and are relatively thick and soft (quite unsuited to being walked on, for example).